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Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

Use of extra-fine crosscut bur to produce horizontal texture in composite resin restorations

  • Pablo Lenin Benitez Sellan
    Affiliations
    Doctoral student, GAPEC – Academic Group of Clinical Research, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Institute of Science and Technology, São Paulo State University (UNESP), São José dos Campos, Brazil

    School of Dentistry, Universidad Espíritu Santo, Samborondon, Ecuador
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  • Eduardo Bresciani
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Dr Eduardo Bresciani, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Institute of Science and Technology, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Av, Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos, São Paulo 12245-000, BRAZIL
    Affiliations
    Associate Professor, GAPEC – Academic Group of Clinical Research, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Institute of Science and Technology, São Paulo State University, São José dos Campos, Brazil
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      Reproducing the developmental lobes and perikymata of the anterior teeth of young patients with composite resin restorations is a clinical challenge.
      • Benitez Sellan P.L.
      • Bresciani E.
      Reshaping a retained deciduous canine with a semidirect composite resin veneer: a clinical report.
      • Romero M.F.
      Esthetic anterior composite resin restorations using a single shade: step-by-step technique.
      • Vanini L.
      Conservative composite restorations that mimic nature.
      Different finishing and polishing systems and techniques are available, although a standard protocol is lacking. The selection of the correct instruments will depend on the position of the tooth and the type of surface to be reproduced. Multibladed and diamond rotary instruments and abrasive rubber points are commonly used for this procedure.
      • Jefferies S.R.
      Abrasive finishing and polishing in restorative dentistry: a state-of-the-art review.
      A diamond rotary instrument is usually used to reproduce the perikymata in the labial surface of young patients. The horizontal texture of the natural young enamel surface is characterized by grooves and thin protrusions parallel to each other (Fig. 1), features that limit the ability of a diamond rotary instrument to reproduce the perikymata.
      • Fahl Jr., N.
      Mastering composite artistry to create anterior masterpieces – part 2.
      This article describes the use of an extra-fine crosscut bur to create grooves resembling the enamel surface. The crosscut characteristics of the blade edges are ideal for this application.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Figure 1Horizontal texture of enamel surface.
      Figure thumbnail gr3
      Figure 3Definitive restoration with simulated perikymata.

      Procedure

      • 1.
        Complete the overall contour of the restoration and place a glyceride-based gel (power block; BM4) to block oxygen and enable optimal light polymerization. Then, make the occlusal adjustment with a multifluted finishing bur (9406FF; KG Sorensen).
      • 2.
        Finish the restorations after 7 days. Start with definitive contouring by using abrasive disks (Sof-lex; 3M ESPE) to eliminate any excessive contour, define different planes of the labial surface, and adjust the tooth width and length.
        • Pontons-Melo J.C.
        • Atzeri G.
        • Collares F.M.
        • Hirata R.
        Cosmetic recontouring for achieving anterior esthetics.
      • 3.
        Use a fine-grit tapered diamond rotary instrument (2135F; KG Sorensen) for the vertical texture consisting of developmental grooves and lobes.
      • 4.
        Use a coarse abrasive rubber point (Jiffy points; Ultradent Products, Inc) to eliminate scratches and obtain a smooth surface.
      • 5.
        To mimick the perikymata, use an extra-fine crosscut bur (TR-2T; Angelus Prima Dental) at a speed of 10 000 rpm (Fig. 2). The rotational direction of the bur should be contrary to the direction of its movement over the restoration surface.
      • 6.
        Use a medium/fine grain abrasive rubber point (Jiffy points; Ultradent Products, Inc) under light pressure to soften the microtexture.
        • St-Pierre L.
        • Martel C.
        • Crépeau H.
        • Vargas M.A.
        Influence of polishing systems on surface roughness of composite resins: polishability of composite resins.
      • 7.
        Finish with a silicon polishing brush (Jiffy Composite Polishing Brush; Ultradent Products, Inc) and a rubber goat-hair brush (Jiffy Goat Hair Brush; Ultradent Products, Inc) impregnated with diamond paste (Diamond Polish Mint; Ultradent Products, Inc) (Fig. 3).

      References

        • Benitez Sellan P.L.
        • Bresciani E.
        Reshaping a retained deciduous canine with a semidirect composite resin veneer: a clinical report.
        J Prosthet Dent. 2020; 123: 196-200
        • Romero M.F.
        Esthetic anterior composite resin restorations using a single shade: step-by-step technique.
        J Prosthet Dent. 2015; 114: 9-12
        • Vanini L.
        Conservative composite restorations that mimic nature.
        J Cosmetic Dent. 2010; 26: 80-98
        • Jefferies S.R.
        Abrasive finishing and polishing in restorative dentistry: a state-of-the-art review.
        Dent Clin North Am. 2007; 51: 379-397
        • Fahl Jr., N.
        Mastering composite artistry to create anterior masterpieces – part 2.
        J Cosmetic Dent. 2011; 26: 42-55
        • Pontons-Melo J.C.
        • Atzeri G.
        • Collares F.M.
        • Hirata R.
        Cosmetic recontouring for achieving anterior esthetics.
        Int J Esthet Dent. 2019; 14: 134-146
        • St-Pierre L.
        • Martel C.
        • Crépeau H.
        • Vargas M.A.
        Influence of polishing systems on surface roughness of composite resins: polishability of composite resins.
        Oper Dent. 2019; 44: E122-E132