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Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

Digital workflow for 3D printed implant surgical guides

  • Brian J. Goodacre
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Brian J. Goodacre, DDS, MSD, Upland Prosthodontics, 250 E. 7th St Suite E, Upland, CA, 91786
    Affiliations
    Director, Clinical Technologies Nobel Biocare North America, California

    Adjunct Professor, Division of General Dentistry, Loma Linda University School of Dentistry, California
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      JPD Digital video

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      Implant dentistry has changed treatment planning and the provision of patient care. Although implants have high success and survival rates, there are challenges to be faced.
      • Goodacre C.J.
      • Bernal G.
      • Rungcharassaeng K.
      • Kan J.Y.
      Clinical complications with implants and implant prostheses.
      Many of these challenges can be linked to poor planning or implant placement.
      • Sones A.D.
      Complications with osseointegrated implants.
      However, excellent tools are now available to assist in prosthetically driven treatment planning.
      The acquisition and superimposition of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and intraoral surface scans allow for highly accurate digital treatment planning and is now the standard treatment, as taught around the world.
      • Rios H.F.
      • Borgnakke W.S.
      • Benavides E.
      The use of cone-beam computed tomography in management of patients requiring dental implants: An American Academy of Periodontology best evidence review.
      Virtual placement allows the implant location to be prosthetically driven. The computer software program gives the clinician the ability to rehearse the procedure before the patient's appointment and ensure all surgical and restorative components are properly selected and ordered, before surgery.
      Although such planning can improve the outcome of the definitive restoration, if the implant is not placed as virtually planned, both surgical and prosthetic challenges may be faced. To attain the planned implant position, a surgical guide can be used, either static or dynamic.
      • Block M.S.
      • Emery R.W.
      Static or dynamic navigation for implant placement—choosing the method of guidance.
      Both assist the clinician with the placement of the implant based on a virtual plan. The focus of this digital presentation was to focus on the workflows, benefits, and limitations of office-printed static implant surgical guides.
      Techniques to acquire high-quality CBCT and intraoral scans as well as the steps involved with importing and designing the surgical guide were reviewed. Once the guide was designed, different considerations assist in the 3D printing and postprocessing of a static surgical guide. Once the surgical guide has been produced, the surgical procedure was detailed to help with the many decisions faced when placing an implant.

      Supplementary Data

      References

        • Goodacre C.J.
        • Bernal G.
        • Rungcharassaeng K.
        • Kan J.Y.
        Clinical complications with implants and implant prostheses.
        J Prosthet Dent. 2003; 90: 121-132
        • Sones A.D.
        Complications with osseointegrated implants.
        J Prosthet Dent. 1989; 62: 581-585
        • Rios H.F.
        • Borgnakke W.S.
        • Benavides E.
        The use of cone-beam computed tomography in management of patients requiring dental implants: An American Academy of Periodontology best evidence review.
        J Periodontol. 2017; 88: 946-959
        • Block M.S.
        • Emery R.W.
        Static or dynamic navigation for implant placement—choosing the method of guidance.
        J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2016; 74: 269-277